19th Sep 2017 8:47:11 PM

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May 14th 2011 was a great learning day for the children, with a small bus provided by Transman, aeroplane-style lunches-on-laps, volunteer Denis Farrell organising and Kerri Wolter and colleagues at the Vulture Rehabilitation Centre in the Magaliesberg area of South Africa, providing the knowledge.

Nine species of vultures have a tough time in Southern Africa as they tend to collide with electrical power lines and are electrocuted. They are endangered.
The rehabilitation centre takes them in and helps them to heal, even to nest and breed.
Some of the species that are helped include the African white-backed vulture, the Hooded Vulture, the Lappet-faced Vulture, the Palm Vulture and the Cape Griffon.
Vultures can live to between 30 and 40 years old but at most lay only one egg a year.
A vulture can see an animal carcase from 2 kilometres up in the sky. The Cape Griffon has a wing span of two-and-a-half metres.
They keep grassland free of rotting carcasses and reduce diseases that way.
More information on Vulpro can be found on www.vultureconservation.co.za The children were chuffed to learn about vultures from the experts and have a healthy respect for their position in the food chain.











Sizwe and Thapelo looking at a vulture under rehabilitation, May 2011.






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